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Solomons Seal



Solomons Seal Monograph


Botanical name(s)

Polygonatum multiflorum (formerly Convallaria), Polygonatum officinale,

Polygonatum odoratum, Polygonatum biflorum, Polygonatum giganteum,

Polygonatum commutatum, Polygonatum canaliculatum, etc.

Common Name

Solomon's seal, sow’s teats, fragrant or aromatic Solomon’s seal, dropberry, sealwort

Family

Asparagaceae

Parts Used

Root/rhizome

Native To

A variety of species of this plant are native to North America, Northern Europe, Siberia, and Asia.

Harvesting Guidelines

Because Solomon's seal reproduces slowly, it appears somewhat rare to find in stands large enough in the wild from which to ethically harvest. Harvest root in Autumn.

 

Solomon's Seal, a plant commonly used in herbal medicine, has been utilized for its healing properties in Asia, Europe, and North America. It is known for its sweet and neutral yin tonic qualities, as well as its ability to nourish and moisturize the body. Its lubricating effects make it particularly useful for reducing inflammation in the tendons, joints, and ligaments caused by dryness. Additionally, it has been traditionally used as a demulcent nutritive, providing soothing relief for irritation in the mucosa lining of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and reproductive systems in both men and women.


Solomon's Seal has been used as a symbol of wisdom and healing in many cultures throughout history. It is named after King Solomon, who was believed to have used the plant's root to heal his wounds. In Native American folklore, the plant is associated with the creation story and is considered a sacred medicine. In traditional Chinese medicine, it is known as "Yu Zhu" and is believed to tonify the yin and nourish the blood.



Solomon's Seal, a plant commonly used in herbal medicine, has been utilized for its healing properties in Asia, Europe, and North America. It is known for its sweet and neutral yin tonic qualities, as well as its ability to nourish and moisturize the body. Its lubricating effects make it particularly useful for reducing inflammation in the tendons, joints, and ligaments caused by dryness. Additionally, it has been traditionally used as a demulcent nutritive, providing soothing relief for irritation in the mucosa lining of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and reproductive systems in both men and women. Because of Solomon's Seals historical use as a lubricating tonic for both male and female sexual systems, the internal use of this herb may benefit vaginal dryness, premature ejacualation and infertility.(1)



Solomon's seal, a plant with a long history of medicinal use, is known for its ability to alleviate musculoskeletal issues. Herbalist Jim McDonald has observed the root's effectiveness in treating a variety of conditions, including broken bones, sprains, tendonitis, arthritis, and joint dryness. While anecdotal evidence is not a substitute for scientific research, many people have reported positive results from using Solomon's seal for these types of ailments.


The roots of Solomon's Seal contain a compound called allantoin, which has been found to have anti-inflammatory, wound-healing, and moisturizing properties. Allantoin is also present in many cosmetic and skincare products, highlighting the herb's potential benefits for maintaining healthy skin.



Solomon's seal is a versatile herb that can benefit people with various levels of physical activity and health conditions. It is particularly useful for athletes, farmers, and those recovering from surgeries or dealing with chronic illnesses. When combined with other herbs like mullein, horsetail, and nettle, it can effectively treat injuries, joint pain, and arthritis. Its healing properties make it a valuable ally for anyone seeking to improve their overall well-being.2)


In Chinese medicine, Solomon's seal is known as yù zhú and is valued for its ability to nourish the yin and moisten dryness in the lungs and stomach. It is also believed to tonify the kidneys and promote the production of bodily fluids.

Solomon's Seal contains compounds that have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, which can help to reduce pain and swelling in the joints. It also contains allantoin, a substance that promotes cell proliferation and tissue regeneration, which can help to support the repair of damaged cartilage and other tissues in the joints.

In addition to its benefits for the joints, Solomon's Seal is also believed to support overall bone health. It contains minerals such as calcium and phosphorus, which are important for building and maintaining strong bones.


 

Adult Dose (3)

Capsule: 600 mg, 3x/day

Poultice: Fresh root mashed and applied topically

Safety

Solomon's seal is generally considered safe when used as directed, with no known negative effects or interactions. However, taking high doses of this herb may cause gastrointestinal discomfort, including nausea and vomiting. It's important to note that the berries of the plant are toxic and should not be consumed internally under any circumstances.

Actions

Amphoteric,Antiarthritic,Antiinflammatory,Astringent,Cardiotonic,Demulcent,Expectorant,Tonic,Vulnerary

Energy

Cooling,Moistening

 

References



(1) Wood, M. (1997). The book of herbal wisdom: Using plants as medicines. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

(2)McKenzie, R. (2018-2019). Solomon’s seal. The Eclectic School of Herbal Medicine. Retrieved from https://www.eclecticschoolofherbalmedicine.com/solomons-seal/)

(3) Medical herbalism by David Hoffman





Information offered on Achula and on this page is for educational purposes only. Achula makes neither medical claim, nor intends to diagnose or treat medical conditions. Women who are pregnant or nursing, and persons with known medical conditions, should consult their licensed healthcare provider before taking any herbal product. Links to external sites are for informational purposes only. Achula neither endorses them nor is in any way responsible for their content. Readers must do their own research concerning the safety and usage of any herbs or supplements.




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Invitado
13 ene

The drawing is clearly plantain

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